Bipolar Disorder https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com Bipolar Disorder Explained Sat, 04 Jul 2020 02:46:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/cropped-bipolar-disorder-explained-book-cover-32x32.jpg Bipolar Disorder https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com 32 32 Is Bipolar Disorder Bad? https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/is-bipolar-disorder-bad/ https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/is-bipolar-disorder-bad/#respond Fri, 19 Jun 2020 02:57:00 +0000 http://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/?p=808 Is Bipolar Disorder bad? Bipolar illness misconceptions, like other mental health and wellness conditions, are often misconstrued. Certainly, when bipolar illness is raised in discussion, relatively connected are a ton of misconceptions and also mistaken ideas. Is Bipolar Disorder bad? This brings about misconstruing the condition, typically to the detriment of individuals with Bipolar affective […]

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Is Bipolar Disorder bad? Bipolar illness misconceptions, like other mental health and wellness conditions, are often misconstrued. Certainly, when bipolar illness is raised in discussion, relatively connected are a ton of misconceptions and also mistaken ideas. Is Bipolar Disorder bad? This brings about misconstruing the condition, typically to the detriment of individuals with Bipolar affective disorder myths themselves. Is Bipolar Disorder bad? It is, besides, extra tough to open regarding your have problem with the condition when it is already so stigmatized. It is essential to maintain ourselves informed and also educated ourselves regarding bipolar illness. Right here are a few misconceptions about bipolar affective disorder that ought to be exposed.

Did You Know?

Is Bipolar Disorder bad? Bipolar illness is much more typical than you would certainly believe. It impacts an approximated 2 million Americans, or almost 2.8% of the adult population. It can develop in anyone, though females are more likely to have it than guys.

Bipolar Is Real

Bipolar disorder is an extremely genuine psychological wellness condition that can have extremely real impacts on one’s quality of life. It ought to be dealt with like any various other physical illness; healing and recovery from bipolar condition demand adequate effort and time. Individuals with bipolar affective disorder should have to be offered the right and proper assistance as those with physical health problem do.

You Can Still Function

Is Bipolar Disorder bad? There are circumstances when the symptoms of bipolar disorder are so serious that they prevent typical functioning, it is feasible to work past it. There are drugs as well as treatment options offered that can aid the majority of people handle the problem. As well as with the appropriate support group, it is possible for people with bipolar affective disorder misconceptions to hold a task and even thrive in the workplace.

It’s Not THAT Bad

Signs of bipolar problem don’t show up all the time. When the condition is frequently handled well, it is feasible for a person with bipolar condition myths to go for months or even years without an episode.

Get Use to Mood Swings

It’s true that everybody has state of mind swings every now and then, but bipolar illness is not that. Mood swings happen for a range of factors, such as the climate, menstruation cycle, or merely the accumulating of bad points taking place one point after another. It can be brought on by adjustments in hormonal agent degrees or can be a signs and symptom of a physical illness.

Extreme Mood Swings

Is Bipolar Disorder bad? In comparison, bipolar problem stands for extreme modifications in an individual’s common self, with extreme shifts in energy and also task. Each episode might last for days or even weeks, therefore when identifying bipolar illness. Medical professionals detecting bipolar illness searches for a group of the signs and symptoms and also not cherry-pick the feelings involved. To put it simply, they seek a whole wet season as well as not simply a single wet day.

Balancing Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar illness is a life-long condition, as well as there is no remedy. It can be dealt with and also taken care of via a mix of drugs, therapies, as well as a healthy and balanced lifestyle. Keeping a routine rest routine, consuming a well-balanced diet regimen, and avoiding stress can aid keep the signs of bipolar condition at bay.

It’s Not Similar to Being Anxious

Depressive episodes can be a symptom of bipolar condition; however it is not the exact same problem. Bipolar affective disorder entails shifting from extreme highs and extreme lows.

Personality Problem?

Bipolar affective disorder misconceptions are not the result of being a flawed person. It is not something that a person can just straightforward eliminate themselves. Cautious, tailored treatment is essential to successfully handle the problem, just like with other health issue. Bipolar problem is not an individual failure neither is it a sign of being malfunctioning or any lesser of human being.

Are You Ready to Be Assessed?

Is Bipolar Disorder bad? It is important to seek specialist health if you assume you or an enjoyed one might have bipolar condition. Talk to a psychoanalyst for a full assessment. Left undiagnosed as well as untreated, bipolar illness can result in a host of troubles that may prevent the person from living a normal, healthy and balanced life. Bipolar disorder is a treatable problem, and like anybody else, those with it deserve an opportunity to lead a complete, satisfying, and also effective life.

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What Are the Types of Bipolar Disorder? https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/what-are-the-types-of-bipolar-disorder/ https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/what-are-the-types-of-bipolar-disorder/#respond Sun, 24 May 2020 14:05:00 +0000 https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/?p=842 What are the types of bipolar disorder? Bipolar disorder causes periods or episodes of abnormal moods or shifting emotional levels. It’s a manic – depressive illness that can strike anytime at any given moment. When a person has this kind of brain disorder; they usually experience various symptoms of psychosis which highly depends on the […]

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What are the types of bipolar disorder? Bipolar disorder causes periods or episodes of abnormal moods or shifting emotional levels. It’s a manic – depressive illness that can strike anytime at any given moment. When a person has this kind of brain disorder; they usually experience various symptoms of psychosis which highly depends on the degree or severity of the condition.

Are You Suicidal?

What are the types of bipolar disorder? Suicidal risks and attempts are the very common among people with a bipolar disorder, especially if they are badly depressed. During those periods, lots of crying, and negativity are involved which is why it is important that people with this disorder are not alone; and is always supported by their family and loved ones. People who are in their 20’s are more inclined to attempt suicide, while people between the ages of 30 and 40 years old most often do harm themselves.

Mood Changes

If for any reason you find yourself constantly changing moods or feeling any abnormal and sudden emotional shifts, you may take some psychological tests; or better yet seek professional help. Talking to counselors, and doctors like a psychiatrist can help you manage this condition; or at least help you deal with it. People with a bipolar disorder will most likely undergo continuous medical treatment especially for severe cases or for those who are always experiencing series of episodes. or

Types of Bipolar Disorder

According to AMA’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders manuals 5th Revision; there are 4 main types or classifications of bipolar disorder. These are Bipolar I and II, Cyclothymic Disorder, and Rapid – Cycling Bipolar Disorder. Before we delve deeper about the different types of bipolar disorder, check out this infographic below for a quick definition of each:

Bipolar I Disorder

Bipolar I disorder is when a person has at least one manic episode; or one depressive episode (with or without any previous depressive or manic episode respectively). Usually patients with bipolar I disorder experienced a depressive episode more than manic episodes. Other clinical or psychotic disorders such as delusional disorder and schizophrenia disorder must not rule out. It is both common in men and women; usually the first episode that men experience is mania, while in women the first episode is depression.

Bipolar II Disorder

Patients diagnosed with bipolar II disorder usually have more the one depression episodes and also one hypomanic episode. Hypomanic episodes are less severe than manic episodes. A person, who experiences hypomanic sleep less, is very outgoing and has lots of energy; the main difference between hypomanic; and manic is that the former is fully functioning and looks completely normal while the latter is experiencing high levels of emotions but may not be properly behaved with others. People who are hypomanic have no psychosis symptoms and their behavior is not something grandiose; or the kind of behavior that will grab everyone’s attention. Usually people diagnose with bipolar II disorder is undergoing a major depression.

Cyclothymic Disorder

Cyclothymic disorder is the milder version of bipolar disorder. People diagnosed with this usually have mood disturbances that have alternate periods of hypomanic episodes; as well as mild to moderate depression. The baseline for cyclothymia patients is when they feel stable but their moods changes in a snap, and fluctuates. They can experience both mild hypomania, and mild depression. This is like the stage 1 of bipolar disorder; people diagnosed with cyclothymia can experience random but noticeable mood swings within a day or a week.

Rapid-Cycling Bipolar Disorder

Rapid – cycling bipolar disorder  also has the same mood swing symptoms, however the difference is that manic and depressive episodes are shorter and rapid; hence its name. The cycles are shorter so the effect it has on people is that manic or depressive states are always changing at a very sudden situation. It is considered the most severe form of bipolar disorder. This is more common among young people, and affects more women than men. They usually experience more than four episodes of major depression, hypomania, or even mixed symptoms within a day or within a week. 

Symptoms of a Bipolar Disorder

As you may now know, bipolar disorder can cause a person to have various mood episodes, and usually goes through a rollercoaster of intense emotions, activity levels; behaviors and also has a different sleeping pattern.  Whatever type of bipolar disorder you or your family has, you will notice it if you watched out for the following signs:

Signs that a person is going through a Manic Episode:

  • Experiencing intensive highs, ups or has an elevated mood
  • Has lots of abnormal energy or increased level of activity
  • Feeling of being wired or jumpy or too overwhelmed and excited
  • Has a trouble sleeping due to constant change in sleep patterns
  • May become more active than usual
  • Can talk really fast about random and unrelated things
  • It might be immediately agitated or irritated
  • Feels like their thoughts are fast or can’t be controlled
  • Thinks that they can do lots of different things all at the same time that it could be too overwhelming for a normal person
  • Are inclined to do reckless things without thinking about it such as randomly spending lots of money or has abnormal sexual urges.

Signs that a person is going through a Depressive Episode:

  • Usually feels sad, very upset, hopeless or has a feeling of emptiness
  • Has little to no energy at all
  • The level of activity in any interest is fleeting or decreasing
  • They either sleep too little or too much
  • Can’t enjoy the simple pleasures in life
  • Is always worried and anxious
  • They can’t focus or has trouble concentrating over something
  • Tend to forget things
  • Either eat too little or too much
  • Feeling of tiredness even if no strenuous or exhausting activity is being done
  • Have suicidal thoughts or have attempted suicide

Signs that a person is going through a Hypomania Episode:

Symptoms of hypomania are similar to the symptoms of a person with a manic episode the only difference is that it is milder but it is still noticeable. Even if the person is feeling well or he/she feels like nothing is wrong with; the signs can be obvious and can be recognize by a mentally healthy person. The mood swings and inappropriate level of activity or unusual changes in behavior. If not treated properly or immediately, hypomanias will most likely progress to sever manic or depression.

Diagnosis

If you think you or any of your friends and family has been experiencing some signs of bipolar disorder; you may want to consult a psychologist or seek medical help as soon as you can. If bipolar disorder is diagnosed at an early stage or treated properly; you’d be able to deal with it and manage its effects. People who seek professional help live very normal and productive lives. 

Before the doctor diagnose you with this mental condition, you may need to complete a physical exam first such as X-rays, CT Scan; blood tests and the like just to rule out other possible conditions. If the mental problem is not caused by any disease or physiological factors such as stress or fatigue; your physician will then conduct a mental health evaluation before referring you to a psychiatrist; sometimes your family doctor or a general doctor can already refer you immediately to a mental health professional so that he/she can conduct the initial mental testing.

Treatment

Treatment is very important for people diagnosed with bipolar disorder because through medical or mental treatment such as therapy; the patient can learn how to manage and gain better control of their mood swings or ever changing emotions as well as other bipolar symptoms.

The most effective treatment procedure includes medication and psychotherapy. Bipolar disorder cannot be completely treated or eradicated; unfortunately it is a lifelong illness. Manic or depressive episodes can come back from time to time even with treatment, some people between episodes are free of mood swings; but for some people have lingering symptoms. The important thing is that even if it is a condition that will last a lifetime, proper and regular treatment can control the bipolar symptoms.

If you are looking to seek medical professional help, then you could choose from a wide range of mental health doctors that specializes in treating bipolar disorders. Some of these doctors are regarded as an expert in a specific form of bipolar condition; it’s better to do your research so you can find out more about them and see if you think they can help you. You should opt to go first to your family doctor or a general physician to rule out any other illness and for him/her to also confirm that you might be suffering from a mental illness. Usually your family physician can give you medications to aid in your mood swings; however he or she will also recommend you to go to a psychologist or psychiatrist for further evaluation.

During initial diagnosis; you will be ask to do several mental health tests like answering mental health evaluations or through talk therapy so that the doctor can further assess your potential condition as well as its degree.

Common Medications

Various kinds of medications are a big help to control and manage symptoms of bipolar disorder. That is why it’s important to always have a follow – up checkup with your doctor or psychotherapist so that you or your doctor can have a gauge if the current medication is working or not. Appropriate medications are generally used as mood stabilizers, antidepressants, and also include atypical antipsychotics.

Psychotherapy

One of the benefits of going through a therapy aside from taking meds is that it can ultimately guide a patient with bipolar disorder on how to manage his/her  condition in a “human level.” It can also provide education and support.

Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT)

This kind of therapy can provide relief especially for people with severe cases of bipolar disorder who were not able to recover from other treatments. ECT is also being used to treat bipolar symptoms for people with other medical condition including women who are pregnant because taking medications can be too risky. However, ECT may also have a short – term side effects such as confusion, memory less, and disorientation.

Sleep Medications

People diagnose with bipolar disorder usually have different sleeping patterns that’s why they have trouble sleeping, usually sleeping medications are prescribed to them by their doctors.

Life Charts

As mentioned earlier, even if you are properly or regularly treated, it doesn’t mean the the mood swings will completely go away. However, it will likely improve the condition of a patient, if he/she works hand in hand with his/her doctor especially when it comes to managing the symptoms, and discussing any issues that may arise. Keeping a life chart that will document the mood swings, the treatments given, sleep patterns, and important life events can help both the patient and the doctor track their progress, and be able to treat the mental condition effectively.

Conclusion

Bipolar disorder is a mental condition that can affect one’s life negatively. It’s an incurable disorder that one has to endure in his/her lifetime. However, for some people they learned how to manage and deal with their untreatable condition, and use it to their advantage. For more info about bipolar disorder, make sure to check out the video below:

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Bipolar Disorder Effects https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/bipolar-disorder-effects/ https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/bipolar-disorder-effects/#respond Sat, 25 Apr 2020 03:47:00 +0000 http://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/?p=748 Bipolar disorder effects, also called manic depression and bipolar disease, is a mental health condition known to affect nearly 2 million American adults. It is characterized by intense shifts in moods and energy levels, swinging from extreme highs to extreme lows. Incidents of extreme emotional highs are called manic episodes, and those of extreme emotional […]

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Bipolar disorder effects, also called manic depression and bipolar disease, is a mental health condition known to affect nearly 2 million American adults. It is characterized by intense shifts in moods and energy levels, swinging from extreme highs to extreme lows. Incidents of extreme emotional highs are called manic episodes, and those of extreme emotional lows are called depressive episodes.

What Happens on a Manic

During a manic episode, a person with bipolar disorder has tremendously high energy levels and feelings of euphoria. They may not be able to fall asleep easily. They may also be more irritable and restless and may experience an increased sex drive. During a manic episode, the high levels of emotions make the person with bipolar disorder more prone to making rash, impulsive decision. They may participate in dangerous activities in pursuit of more thrill. They may begin to use drugs, consume lots of alcohol, and participate in risky sexual activities.

What Happens on a Depressive

During a depressive episode, on the other hand, a person with bipolar disorder has tremendously low energy levels and feelings of lethargy. They may sleep too much and withdraw in on themselves. They may seek isolation and seclusion from other people, thus contributing to feelings of extreme sadness, loneliness, and hopelessness.

As a mental health condition, bipolar disorder effects primarily impacts the brain. As a consequence, the brain of a person with bipolar disorder may have subtle differences in size and activity than the brain of someone who doesn’t have the condition. These differences, though small, can still have significant effects, which may include a tendency to be more irritable, aggressive, or hopeless, having feelings of guilt or severe sadness, loss of interest in hobbies enjoyed in the past, and forgetfulness.

Brain Imbalances

The imbalances in brain activity also makes it difficult to focus or concentrate. For instance, when experiencing a manic episode, it may be difficult for someone with bipolar disorder to keep track of their thoughts. This may lead to them being easily distracted. They may even talk faster than usual as a way to keep up with their racing thoughts. The high energy levels associated with manic episodes mean the person may experience difficulties in falling asleep, or may not try falling asleep at all as they feel constant excitement.  

On the flipside, a depressive episode can also lead to difficulties in concentration, though this time it’s because the brain is slower in processing things than usual. Memory might also suffer, and the person may have a hard time making decisions as well.

Aside from the impact it has on one’s mood, bipolar disorder also affects other aspects of one’s health.

Effect of Bipolar Disorder on the Cardiovascular system

Bipolar disorder can affect the cardiovascular system. Its symptoms, for instance, especially during a manic episode, can lead to the person experiencing heart palpitations, rapid heart rate, and an increased pulse. The spike in energy levels may also induce an increase in blood pressure.

Effects of Bipolar Disorder on the Endocrine system

The endocrine system is in charge of the body’s hormone levels, which are reliant on the signals from the brain. Since bipolar disorder effects causes disruptions in brain activity, the signals for the endocrine system are mixed up as well, leading to fluctuations in hormones.

Body Functions

Due to this, a lot of body functions are affected as well. For instance, during a manic episode, hormones for sexual activities may increase, leading to an increase in sex drive too. On the other hand, the lethargy often associated with a depressive episode may lead to a significant decrease in sex drive.

During manic episodes, a person with bipolar disorder is more prone to having poor judgment and poor decision-making skills in various aspects, including sexual health.

During depressive episodes, a person with bipolar disorder might experience lack of will to live and thus have a decrease in their appetite as well.

Effects of Bipolar Disorder on the Skeletal and Muscular Systems

During depressive episodes, the body may feel unexpected aches and pains that make it difficult to perform normal day-to-day activities. Depressive episodes often lead the person to pay less attention to how they take care of their body; they forget to eat well, and they often refuse to exert themselves in physical activities.

During depressive episodes, the person with bipolar disorder effects may also experience weakness and fatigue, which may weaken their bones and muscles.

Other Effects of Bipolar Disorder

The symptoms of bipolar disorder effects makes it difficult to function normally at work or in school. It also leads to poor decision-making sometimes, which may lead to the person to engage with dangerous activities such as heavy alcohol use and drug misuse, both of which could have detrimental effects on their body. Unregulated alcohol consumption can lead to alcohol poisoning, and there are many ways in which taking drugs could go significantly wrong.

Outlook for Bipolar Disorder

People with bipolar disorder effects can experience these negative effects on their body, but it is still possible for them to lead happy lives. With the right kind of treatment plans and support system, they can have and maintain happy relationships both personally and professionally.

If you think you or someone you know have bipolar disorder, consult with a mental health care professional immediately.

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Is Bipolar Disorder Hereditary? https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/is-bipolar-disorder-hereditary/ https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/is-bipolar-disorder-hereditary/#respond Tue, 17 Mar 2020 03:42:00 +0000 http://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/?p=746 Bipolar disorder is a mental health condition affecting nearly 2 million American adults. This condition is characterized by extreme mood swings, shifting between episodes of extreme highs (manic) and episodes of extreme lows (depressive). Three Bipolar Disorder Types There are three main types of bipolar disorder: bipolar I, bipolar II, and cyclothymia Bipolar I is […]

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Bipolar disorder is a mental health condition affecting nearly 2 million American adults. This condition is characterized by extreme mood swings, shifting between episodes of extreme highs (manic) and episodes of extreme lows (depressive).

Three Bipolar Disorder Types

There are three main types of bipolar disorder: bipolar I, bipolar II, and cyclothymia

  • Bipolar I is characterized by the manifestation of at least one manic episode, typically experienced in-between hypomanic and depressive episodes.
  • Bipolar II is characterized by experiencing a depressive episode that can last for at least 2 weeks, with a hypomanic episode lasting at least 4 days. Bipolar II occurs more in women than in men.
  • Cyclothymia cycles through episodes of hypomania and depression, with symptoms less severe than in bipolar I and bipolar II.

Even now, the exact cause of bipolar disorder is unknown. However, there are known factors that increase risks of developing the disorder, the most prevalent of which is hereditary. Indeed, researchers have found a possible link between bipolar disorder and genetics.

Hereditary and Bipolar Disorder

If your family has a known history of having bipolar disorder, then there is increased risk of you developing the same. The closer that family member’s relationship to you is, the higher the risk. For instance, if your grandparent has bipolar disorder, you have a higher chance of developing the condition than someone whose great-grandparent has it.

However, that doesn’t mean that you would definitely develop the disorder; the genetic link merely increases the risks. In some cases, even if the parent has bipolar disorder, the children don’t necessarily develop the condition. There are also cases where there’s no history at all of bipolar disorder developing in anyone in the family only for it to develop in the latest generation. To be sure, however, you may consult with a professional to conduct a screening for bipolar disorder.

Other risk factors and triggers for bipolar disorder

Aside genetics and hereditary, there are other risk factors for developing bipolar disorder.

Brain structure

There may be small differences in brain size and activity in people with bipolar disorder. Irregularities in brain size, structure, or function can increase risk of developing bipolar disorder.

Environmental factors

External factors may have adverse effects on your psyche and may lead to the development of bipolar disorder. For instance, undergoing extreme stress, going through a traumatic experience, or having a severe physical illness may contribute to the development of the condition.

Other risk factors for bipolar disorder includes heavy drug use or alcohol consumption as well as unhealthy lifestyle patterns such as constant lack of sleep.

Testing for bipolar disorder

Bipolar disorder isn’t evaluated with just one examination. Your doctor will have to use various tests and tools for a comprehensive evaluation of your condition.

Physical exam

A full physical exam may be ordered by your doctor to ensure an extensive assessment. This may include blood tests and asking for your family’s medical history. A physical exam is the easiest way of ruling out other causes of your symptoms.

Mental health evaluation

A psychologist or psychiatrist will conduct a full psych evaluation to assess your mental health. During this evaluation, they will look for hereditary signs of bipolar disorder or other mental health conditions.

Mood journal

The doctor may ask you to keep track of your hereditary behavioural changes or mood shifts by keeping a journal. A journal is a simple yet effective tool for charting how your emotions change in a certain period of time, as well as how long those emotions last.

Treatment Options

Though there is no known cure yet for bipolar disorder, there are various treatment options available to help manage its symptoms effectively. Management strategies for bipolar disorder include, primarily, medications, hereditary, various therapies, as well as making healthy lifestyle changes.

The most common medications for bipolar disorder are mood stabilizers, such as lithium. , As people with bipolar disorder are observed to have higher levels of sodium in the cells, lithium helps lower the sodium levels.

There are various therapies that can be used as well, including cognitive behavior therapy. This therapy helps you talk through your condition, allowing you to work through your emotions and thus understand your own thinking patterns. Understanding how you think and learning how to recognize the onset of your symptoms can help you create a positive coping hereditary strategy.

Another type of therapy is psychoeducation or counselling for you and your loved ones. Psychoeducation aims to help you and other understand your condition better, thus allowing you to help each other in managing it more effectively as a harmonious unit.

See a Doctor

If you think you or a loved one has bipolar disorder, it’s best to consult with a professional immediately. Diagnosis is the first step to coming up with a treatment plan that can help effectively manage the condition, which in turn could provide a way for you to live a fuller, satisfying life.

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Can a Ketogenic Diet Help Treat Bipolar Disorder? https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/can-a-ketogenic-diet-help-treat-bipolar-disorder/ https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/can-a-ketogenic-diet-help-treat-bipolar-disorder/#respond Sat, 29 Feb 2020 03:37:00 +0000 http://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/?p=744 Bipolar disorder is a mental health condition that affects an estimated 2 million Americans. It can disrupt day-to-day activities and hinder normal functioning, affecting every facet of your life, even your relationships. Fortunately, bipolar disorder is a very treatable disease. With the combination of medications, therapies, and healthy lifestyle changes, symptoms of bipolar disorder can […]

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Bipolar disorder is a mental health condition that affects an estimated 2 million Americans. It can disrupt day-to-day activities and hinder normal functioning, affecting every facet of your life, even your relationships.

Fortunately, bipolar disorder is a very treatable disease. With the combination of medications, therapies, and healthy lifestyle changes, symptoms of bipolar disorder can be effectively managed in order for the individual to lead a normal life.

What is Ketogenic Diet?

Aside from the tried and tested methods and strategies for managing bipolar disorder, advances in our society continually provide new ways that we could explore in hopes of better outcomes. These advances include the influx of alternative therapies, such as diet changes.

One of the most popular diet now is ketogenic diets. Though it has been around for decades, it is only now showing a definite rise in popularity. And according to some studies, the elements involved in a ketogenic diet could help people with bipolar disorder.

Improving Health through Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet has been around for almost a century, first cropping up in the 1920s. This diet is primarily composed of high-fat, low-carbohydrate foods that trigger a reaction in your body that imitates what happens if you were fasting. This metabolic state in your body is known as ketosis.

Sources of Energy

Carbohydrates such as glucose are the body’s main source of energy. Glucose, in particular, supplies most of the fuel the brain needs in order to function properly. When carbohydrates are removed from our diet, the body then switches to fat reserves as the main source of energy. To use fats as an energy source, the liver has to break them down into substances known as ketones. Ketones have higher energy content compared to carbohydrates.

Versions of Ketogenic Diet

Ketosis allows the body to be much more efficient in burning fats for energy. The ketones produced are then used as fuel for the brain. Ketogenic diets are known to improve health conditions as it reduces the blood sugar and insulin levels.

Ketegonic Diet Versions

The ketogenic diet has various versions.

  • The standard ketogenic diet is a very low-carb, moderate-protein, and high-fat variation. The percentage is typically 75% fats, 20% protein, and 5% carbohydrates.
  • The cyclical ketogenic diet, as the name suggests, cycles on ketogenic days and high-carb days. Typically, each cycle would have 5 ketogenic days followed by 2 high-carb days.
  • The targeted ketogenic diet takes into account your workout sessions. It allows for more carb intake during workout days to prevent burnout.
  • The high-protein ketogenic diet includes a higher protein ratio compared to the standard variation. It consists of a decreased 60% fats compared to the standard 75%. The protein content is at 35% while the carbohydrates remain at 5%.

How the Ketogenic Diet May Help the Brain

The ketogenic diet began as a tool for improving and treating certain neurological diseases. Indeed, further research has found that it can help with certain brain conditions.

  • Alzheimer’s Disease – The ketogenic diets has been shown to help reduce symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease as well as slow down its progression.
  • Epilepsy – Research has shown that the ketogenic diet can help reduce the number of seizures experience by children with epilepsy.
  • Parkinson’s Disease – The ketogenic diet has been shown to help manage the symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease.

Aside from these diseases, the ketogenic diet has been shown to help improve risk factors for heart disease, including HDL cholesterol levels, blood sugar levels, and blood pressure. Some also say that this diet can reduce concussions and aid in faster recovery from brain injuries.

Ketogenic Diet for Bipolar Disorder

Anti-seizure medicines, the same drugs used to treat people with epilepsy, are fixtures of bipolar disorder treatment. This made researchers wonder if a diet that helps with epilepsy symptoms could also help people with bipolar disorder.

There’s reason to believe it can. During a depressed or manic episode, energy production slows in the brain. Eating ketogenic diets can increase energy in the brain.

Can the Ketogenic Diet Help with Bipolar Disorder?

Given how ketogenic diet has been helping with other conditions involving the brain, it can also theoretically aid in managing bipolar disorder. However, little reason has been done on the subject matter.

Regardless, it should be noted that ketogenic diet has shown potential in improving one’s well-being. For a conclusive answer on how ketogenic diets can help the bipolar disorder population, further studies would have to be conducted.

Should You Try a Ketogenic Diet?

Making healthy lifestyle changes is one of the strategies for leading a better life. There is potential for ketogenic diet to help with managing bipolar disorder, but since the research is limited, it’s best for you to keep to a well-balanced diet in the meantime. The ketogenic diet can be very limiting, with lots of restrictions placed. This could lead to nutritional deficiencies that would certainly be detrimental to your health in the long run.  

If you want to try a ketogenic diet, you should consult with your doctor first. It is such a drastic shift from a regular diet, so proper preparation is important. Your doctor may also instead suggest another treatment option if a ketogenic diets is not feasible for you.

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Bipolar Disorder Myths vs. Facts https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/bipolar-disorder-myths-vs-facts/ https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/bipolar-disorder-myths-vs-facts/#respond Mon, 20 Jan 2020 03:33:00 +0000 http://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/?p=742 Bipolar disorder myths, like other mental health conditions, are often misunderstood. Indeed, when bipolar disorder is brought up in conversation, seemingly attached are a ton of misconceptions and mistaken beliefs. This leads to misunderstanding the condition, often to the detriment of people with Bipolar disorder myths themselves. It is, after all, more difficult to open […]

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Bipolar disorder myths, like other mental health conditions, are often misunderstood. Indeed, when bipolar disorder is brought up in conversation, seemingly attached are a ton of misconceptions and mistaken beliefs. This leads to misunderstanding the condition, often to the detriment of people with Bipolar disorder myths themselves. It is, after all, more difficult to open up about your struggles with the condition when it is already so stigmatized.

To help address this, it is important to keep ourselves informed and educated ourselves about bipolar disorder. Here are a few myths about bipolar disorder that should be debunked.

MYTH #1: Bipolar disorder is rare.

Bipolar disorder is more common than you’d think. It affects an estimated 2 million Americans, or nearly 2.8% of the adult population. It can develop in anyone, though women are more likely to have it than men.

MYTH #2: Bipolar disorder is not real and simply an imagined condition.

Bipolar disorder is a very real mental health condition that can have very real effects on one’s quality of life. It should be treated like any other physical illness; recovery and healing from bipolar disorder need ample time and effort. People with bipolar disorder deserve to be given the right and proper support as those with physical illness do.

MYTH #3: People with bipolar disorder are unable to work.

Though there are instances when the symptoms of bipolar disorder are so severe that they hinder normal functioning, it is possible to work past it. There are medications and treatment options available that can help most people cope with the condition. And with the right support system, it is possible for people with bipolar disorder myths to hold a job and even thrive in the workplace.

MYTH #4: Bipolar disorder means constantly being ill.

Symptoms of bipolar disorder don’t manifest all the time. It is generally characterized by episodes of extreme highs and extreme lows. Between these episodes are stretches of stability. When the condition is constantly managed well, it is possible for a person with bipolar disorder myths to go for months or even years without an episode.

MYTH #5: Bipolar disorder is just a fancy way of saying mood swings.

It’s true that everyone has mood swings every now and again, but bipolar disorder is not that. Mood swings happen for a variety of reasons, such as the weather, menstrual cycle, or simply the piling up of bad things happening one thing after another. It can be caused by changes in hormone levels or can be a symptom of a physical disease.

Drastic Changes

In contrast, bipolar disorder represents drastic changes in a person’s usual self, with extreme shifts in energy and activity. Each episode may last for days or even weeks, and so when diagnosing bipolar disorder. Clinicians diagnosing bipolar disorder looks for a group of the symptoms and not cherry-pick the emotions involved. In other words, they look for an entire rainy season and not just a single rainy day.

MYTH #6: Bipolar disorder can be cured by a healthy lifestyle.

Bipolar disorder is a life-long disease, and there is no cure. However, it can be treated and managed through a combination of medications, therapies, and a healthy lifestyle. Maintaining a regular sleep schedule, eating a well-balanced diet, and avoiding stress can help keep the symptoms of bipolar disorder at bay.

Learning as much as possible about the condition as well as learning to recognize the warning signs of a mood swing can also help in managing bipolar disorder myths. It is important to communicate well with the doctors and therapists to create a more effective treatment plan that can help reduce relapses.

MYTH #7: Bipolar disorder and depression are the same.

Depressive episodes can be a symptom of bipolar disorder, but it is not the same condition. Bipolar disorder involves shifting from manic episodes (extreme highs) and depressive episodes (extreme lows).

MYTH #8: Bipolar disorder is caused by a character flaw.

Bipolar disorder myths are not the result of being a flawed individual. It is not something that someone can just simple rid of themselves. Careful, personalized treatment is necessary to effectively manage the condition, just like with other health problems. Bipolar disorder is not a personal failure nor is it a sign of being defective or any lesser of human being.

Seeking Professional Help

If you think you or a loved one may have bipolar disorder, it is important to seek professional health. Consult with a psychiatrist for a full evaluation. Left undiagnosed and untreated, bipolar disorder can lead to a host of problems that may hinder the person from living a normal, healthy life.

Bipolar disorder is a treatable condition, and like anyone else, those with it deserve a chance to lead a full, satisfying, and productive life. Erasing the stigma that surrounds mental health conditions such as bipolar disorder is the first step to making our society kinder and better.

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Pregnancy Care and Bipolar Disorder https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/pregnancy-care-and-bipolar-disorder/ https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/pregnancy-care-and-bipolar-disorder/#respond Fri, 20 Dec 2019 02:16:00 +0000 http://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/?p=735 Bipolar disorder is a mental illness characterized by extreme mood swings. Also called bipolar disease or manic depression, bipolar disorder is known to affect an estimated 5 million Americans, or around 2.8% of the adult population. Bipolar disorder is rather difficult to treat as those who have the illness shift from extremely high (manic) episodes […]

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Bipolar disorder is a mental illness characterized by extreme mood swings. Also called bipolar disease or manic depression, bipolar disorder is known to affect an estimated 5 million Americans, or around 2.8% of the adult population. Bipolar disorder is rather difficult to treat as those who have the illness shift from extremely high (manic) episodes and extremely low (depressive) episodes.

Three Symptoms

Bipolar disorder typically involves three symptoms: mania, hypomania, and depression.

  • Mania, characterized by emotional highs. During such episodes, the person with bipolar disorder may feel excitement, impulsiveness, euphoria, and high levels of energy. Such emotions lead them to participate in thrilling activities or make impulsive decisions, such as going on a binge or going on shopping sprees. They may also exhibit dangerous behaviors such as using drugs.
  • Hypomania, characterized by feelings of excitement though not as extreme as mania. Though not necessarily hinder routine activities and normal functioning, there is still a marked shift in the person’s mood.
  • Depression, characterized by emotional lows. During such episodes, the person experiences immense sadness, deep regret, loss of energy, lack of drive or interest to do things they used to love, feelings of desperation and desolation, and having suicidal thoughts.

Pregnancy Care Conditions

Due to the difficulties brought about by the condition, most people with bipolar disorder avoid making life-changing decisions. This includes pregnancy.

When considering pregnancy care, a person with bipolar disorder should first have a thorough discussion with both their partner and their doctor. Several factors to consider include how well the disorder has been managed so far, what medications are being taken, as well as how severe the symptoms can be during episodes. Additionally, the effects of pregnancy on hormone levels should be considered also.

Though it is possible for bipolar people to have healthy pregnancies and babies, the risks about such a pregnancy should not be forgotten. If you have a bipolar disorder and are considering pregnancy care, you should know that there is increased risk of you developing postpartum psychosis (especially if women in your family are known to have the condition), postnatal depression, as well as having relapses during the pregnancy.

Managing Bipolar Disorder during Pregnancy

The most crucial concerns when considering bipolar disorder and pregnancy care are the medications. Most medications prescribed to stabilise moods and emotions can be dangerous to a developing fetus. However, if you do end up getting pregnant, make sure to talk to your doctor before stopping taking your meds. Doing so right away may cause withdrawal symptoms and cause more complications.

Sometimes, carrying on with taking your medications is better because the benefits from them far outweigh the risks to the pregnancy care. Either way, you would first need to consult with your doctor before making any decision.

Psychotherapy

This is why it’s also incredibly important to tell your obstetrician immediately that you have bipolar disorder, or tell your doctor that you are planning to get pregnant. Together, your healthcare specialists would devise a treatment plan that would work for you during pregnancy. It might be to cease taking your meds or to rely on other treatment options for bipolar disorder such as psychotherapy. You may be asked to either continue with your current medication at the current dose, to stay with the current medication but with reduced dosage, or to switch to a different prescription altogether.

Whichever the case, utmost care is important during this very sensitive time. Forthrightness to all your healthcare providers is necessary as well to prevent and avoid complications from arising.

Assessments

Aside from the pregnancy care itself, factors that would have to be considered include how you will be treated during the birth and afterwards. Assessments will be made to check whether it is advisable for you to breastfeed or avoid it. Breast milk can carry lithium, which is not good for the baby but could help with the mother’s condition. Another consideration is how breastfeeding mothers typically have to stay up late for night feedings. This leads to lack of sleep, which could negatively affect their moods and general mental health.

You will also be closely monitored for relapses or displays of symptoms after you have given birth. A treatment plan specifically for your care after birth would have to be devised, and afterwards, the plan should be shared with those involved in your pregnancy care, whether it be your partner, your parents, or your friends.

Tips for Coping with Symptoms of Bipolar Disorder

Aside from keeping with the treatment plan devised for you, there are other steps you can follow to help make the pregnancy care easier to bear.

  • Avoid stressful situations as much as possible to keep the risks of triggering mood swings at a minimum.
  • If stress is unavoidable, use cognitive behaviour therapy techniques to cope.
  • Look after yourself, not just mentally but physical as well. Eat a balanced diet, keep yourself hydrated, and keep yourself active as much as possible.
  • Take your medication unless otherwise ordered by your doctor.
  • Keep a routine as much as you can. This includes sticking to a regular eating and sleeping schedule.
  • Learn to recognize symptoms of mood swings.

With proper care and the right kind of help, people with bipolar disorder could lead regular lives. Planning ahead is key to as smooth a process as possible.

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Can Bipolar Disorder Be Treated? https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/can-bipolar-disorder-be-treated/ https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/can-bipolar-disorder-be-treated/#respond Fri, 30 Aug 2019 21:39:16 +0000 http://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/?p=594 Can Bipolar Disorder be Treated? Yes it can be treated. However, this condition is something that patients have to learn to manage for the rest of their lives. This is because even though bipolar disorder can be treated, relapses can happen. Continuous or follow – up treatment might be recommended depending on the progress of […]

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Can Bipolar Disorder be Treated? Yes it can be treated. However, this condition is something that patients have to learn to manage for the rest of their lives. This is because even though bipolar disorder can be treated, relapses can happen. Continuous or follow – up treatment might be recommended depending on the progress of the patient’s condition. In this article, you’ll learn the answer to your question, can bipolar disorder be treated?

Can bipolar disorder be treated: Severity of the Symptoms

Can Bipolar Disorder be Treated? The types of episodes as well as the severity of the symptoms that a patient goes through usually depend on the type of bipolar disorder either type I or type II, although there are other mental conditions that is also exhibiting symptoms similar to bipolar disorder.

How the person acts during their bipolar episodes as well as how long the symptoms last is subjective and can vary greatly. For mood episodes, it can last for a couple of days to a week or two. Regardless of the bipolar disorder type, the episodes are interspersed with periods where they don’t experience any symptoms or they are functioning on a normal state. This is very important to remember. Patients do not exhibit manic or depressive moods all the time.

Laboratory Tests

Can bipolar disorder be treated? Most patients have gotten used to doing specialized blood tests as well as typical laboratory tests as it usually help physicians make an accurate findings. However, most imaging and lab tests are not useful to properly diagnosed bipolar disorder.  Perhaps the most important diagnostic tool is when a person consults with his/ her doctor to talk about the symptoms that one may be having. If you’re feeling some sort of mood swings or unusual behaviors and a change in lifestyle habits, it’s best to talk to a professional. Obviously, physical tests can reveal the overall state of a patient. In this way, the doctor can be more accurate with his diagnosis, and your illness will also be effectively and properly treated. 

Can bipolar disorder be treated: Medications and Management

Can bipolar disorder be treated? As we’ve mentioned earlier, bipolar disorder is treatable. The treatment and management of the bipolar disorder usually involve medication but it can also be in combination with psychotherapy or talk therapy. Keep in mind that each person is different which means the management of the disorder is personalized depending on the severity of the condition. Different people respond in different ways so there’s no guarantee that medications and psychotherapy will immediately cure the illness. Patients may also need to try various combinations of medications and therapy methods to see what works or doesn’t work for them.

Can bipolar disorder be treated? Prescribed medications are also known as mood stabilizers. When it comes to psychotherapy, the patient can work with a mental health professional or a psychiatrist in order to deal with their condition, better understand what’s happening and also rebuild relationships or their function in society.

What About Relapse?

Can bipolar disorder be treated? A psychiatrist prescribes medications as part of the patient’s treatment plan. Keep in mind that bipolar disorder is a kind of recurring mental problem which means it can come back. There could be instances of relapse which is why ongoing preventive treatment is advised. In most cases, the condition can be controlled in a much better way if the patient receives continuous treatment.

Can bipolar disorder be treated? There are however some cases that both psychotherapy and medication haven’t helped. This is why a treatment called Electroconvulsive Therapy is used. This procedure usually takes around ten minutes or so.

Bipolar disorder can certainly interrupt a person’s life. This can also create an intense and stressful environment around their personal and professional lives. This is why it’s very important for them to get professional help. For family members, it’s also good to join support groups so that they can learn strategies on how to deal with their relatives who have this condition. It’s also a good thing for families to be an active part of treatment while gaining support for themselves.

A Lifelong Condition

According to experts, this condition is a lifelong diagnosis that may around the early 20s. Some people do exhibit symptoms at a young age, while some feel it in their late adulthood. Usually, after the manifestation of 1st mood – elevate episodes, the patient will learn from their physicians that they are always going to be at risk of having another episode/s for the rest of their lives.  

This is why a patient diagnosed with bipolar disorder will most likely need to work with a therapist all their lives as well as be on medication. You see, symptoms won’t magically disappear just because you’ve been taking meds, going to therapy or simply taking the time and effort to develop coping methods. Having a mental health condition is like having a cold but it’s in your head. Sometimes you’ll feel good, sometimes not so much; sometimes you need to sleep on it etc. Medication and therapy certainly helps if you want to go through this with ease.

The key is to keep doing the right thing and embracing your condition so that you can find ways on how you can better deal with it. We hope this article answer your question, can bipolar disorder be treated? Stay tune for more posts!

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Is Bipolar Disorder a Mental Illness? https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/is-bipolar-disorder-a-mental-illness/ https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/is-bipolar-disorder-a-mental-illness/#respond Mon, 12 Aug 2019 21:33:03 +0000 http://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/?p=591 Is bipolar disorder a mental illness? Yes it is. You might often hear that people diagnosed with this condition makes a person experience mood swings or switch personality all the time. Another common misconception is that a bipolar person is feeling manic at all times. Is bipolar disorder a mental illness? These descriptions are often […]

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Is bipolar disorder a mental illness? Yes it is. You might often hear that people diagnosed with this condition makes a person experience mood swings or switch personality all the time. Another common misconception is that a bipolar person is feeling manic at all times. Is bipolar disorder a mental illness? These descriptions are often times stigmatizing and above all incorrect. In this article, we will clarify what bipolar disorder really is, and answer the question, is bipolar disorder a mental illness?

Is bipolar disorder a mental illness: What Patients Actually Experience

There are many aspects that people don’t understand about this mental disorder. In this section, we will discuss what many people living with this diagnosis actually experience so that we can paint a more accurate picture of what this condition really is. We will also discuss facts about bipolar disorder and determine is bipolar disorder a mental illness?

Fact #1: People with bipolar disorder are not always experiencing symptoms

People with bipolar disorder experience extreme states or moods along with heightened or lowered energy levels but it doesn’t happen around the clock.

Feeling Anxious vs. Anxiety Disorder

The shifts in moods are known as episodes – there are a few types of these:

  • Manic Episode: This happens when the person is characterized by manifesting high energy levels. They are on a state of euphoria and they also feel too confident to the point of recklessness. They don’t need to sleep because they can’t since their mind is in a euphoric state. The patient may also feel agitation or extreme irritation while feeling super energized.
  • Hypomanic Episode: This is a form of manic episode but the symptoms are less severe. It still presents with super high energy levels and the feeling of not needing to sleep.
  • Depressive Episode: A depressive episode can cause a patient to feel fatigued, down or just super sad. They also have a hard time focusing on the task at hand. They are also at huge risk of committing suicide which is why it’s recommended that they have someone to look after them whenever they are manifesting depressive symptoms.
  • Mixed Episode: A mixed episode means that the patient is manifesting both manic and depressive episodes while the symptoms of opposite mood is occurring.

The types of episodes as well as the severity of the symptoms that a patient goes through usually depend on the type of bipolar disorder (either type I or type II, although there are other mental conditions that is also exhibiting symptoms similar to bipolar disorder). How the person acts during their bipolar episodes as well as how long the symptoms last is subjective and can vary greatly. For mood episodes, it can last for a couple of days to a week or two.

Regardless of the bipolar disorder type, the episodes are interspersed with periods where they don’t experience any symptoms or they are functioning on a normal state. This is very important to remember. Patients do not exhibit manic or depressive moods all the time.

A patient shares that when she told a friend of hers that she’s been diagnosed with bipolar disorder, the friend said “that explains why you’re so happy all the time.” This is a wrong interpretation. You have to understand that there is a difference to one’s natural personality and the manic symptoms that are showing up. According to the patient, she’s a naturally cheerful person but there are times when she overthinks and become frantic. The latter is the signs of bipolar disorder but it should not confuse with someone’s personality.

Fact #2: The bipolar condition is often mistaken as other kind of mental disorder

Is bipolar disorder a mental illness? The symptoms that are being exhibited by people diagnosed with bipolar disorder are similar to other kinds of mental conditions such as schizophrenia and depression. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, this is the reason why sometimes physicians find it hard to clinically pinpoint the disorder.

People who are suffering from these symptoms usually have other conditions concurrently. Sometimes a patient can have a bipolar disorder while at the same time having an anxiety disorder. This can make it even more difficult to separate or rule out certain symptoms to pinpoint if a person truly has bipolar disorder.

Fact #3: No two people experience the symptoms in exactly the same way

According to experts, the cycle and how the bipolar disorder episodes present varies on each individual. Different factors come to play including the patient’s age, illness severity, which medications they are being treated with now, which medications they were treated with previously, other conditions they may have etc.

This is the reason why bipolar disorder can be very complex to manage and treat. One way of ensuring that a patient gets a successful treatment is through keeping a regular or open communication with their physicians.

Fact #4: Not every patterns and symptoms align with the clinical guidelines for diagnosing bipolar disorder

Is bipolar disorder a mental illness? According to the latest edition of clinical guidelines of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, for a person to be diagnosed with this condition, he/ she need to show a certain number of specific symptoms. This will determine if the person is exhibiting manic, hypomanic or depressive symptoms.

For instance, if you have 2 to 4 symptoms present, you may clinically have a mood elevation. Doctors call this as partial remission which means that the patient is showing sub – diagnostic symptoms.

Here’s the thing though, it does not mean that if a person doesn’t meet all of the clinical criteria, the symptoms should be ignored. If the clinical criteria for having a mood episode is not all there or the checkbox isn’t all ticked, mood changes should still be taken into consideration. For most experts, the main concern is to prevent symptoms as early as possible. So, if a person is showing some form of abnormal behavior and thinking, it needs to be addressed early and quickly before it gets worse. We hope this article enlightened you with what this condition is and answered your question, is bipolar disorder a mental illness?

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What is Bipolar II Disorder? https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/what-is-bipolar-ii-disorder/ https://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/what-is-bipolar-ii-disorder/#respond Mon, 12 Aug 2019 21:21:38 +0000 http://www.bipolardisorderexplained.com/?p=588 What is Bipolar II disorder? Before we discuss what is bipolar II disorder, we will first give you a background on what the risk factors are for bipolar disorder in general. We will also discuss how physicians diagnose, treat, or manage the symptoms of patience experiencing this. In this article, we will also delve deeper […]

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What is Bipolar II disorder? Before we discuss what is bipolar II disorder, we will first give you a background on what the risk factors are for bipolar disorder in general. We will also discuss how physicians diagnose, treat, or manage the symptoms of patience experiencing this. In this article, we will also delve deeper on what is bipolar II disorder?

What is bipolar II disorder: Risk Factors of Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder can be passed on from one generation to another. As a matter of fact, 80 to 90% of patients diagnosed with this condition have relatives who either have bipolar disorder, or some related form of mental issue. However, it’s also important to note that even those who don’t have a family history of the disease can still be diagnosed as bipolar. Some factors that can contribute or could trigger manic/ hypomanic/ depressive episodes are the following:

  • Substance abuse
  • Alcohol abuse
  • Stress
  • Sleep Disruption

Treatment and Management

Fortunately, bipolar disorder is treatable. The treatment and management of the disorder usually involves medication but it can also be in combination with psychotherapy or talk therapy. These are usually implemented until symptoms disappear which can take some time. Keep in mind that each person is different which means the management of the disorder is personalized depending on the severity of the condition. Different people respond in different ways so there’s no guarantee that medications and psychotherapy will immediately cure the illness. Patients may also need to try various combinations of medications and therapy methods to see what works or doesn’t work for them.

Prescribed medications are also known as mood stabilizers. Anti – convulsant meds are also sometimes used when the person is experiencing a severe episode. When it comes to psychotherapy, the patient can work with a mental health professional or a psychiatrist in order to deal with their condition, better understand what’s happening and also rebuild relationships or their function in society.

A psychiatrist prescribes medications as part of the patient’s treatment plan. Keep in mind that bipolar disorder is a kind of recurring mental problem which means it can come back. There could be instances of relapse which is why ongoing preventive treatment is advised. In most cases, the condition can be controlled in a much better way if the patient receives continuous treatment.

Alternative Methods

There are however some cases that both psychotherapy and medication haven’t helped. This is why a treatment called ECT or Electroconvulsive Therapy is used. What ECT does is that it uses an electrical current that’s then applied to the scalp while the patient is under anesthesia. This procedure usually takes around 10 to 15 minutes. Patients are usually instructed to do two to three sessions per week for a total of 6 to 12 treatments depending on the condition.

Bipolar disorder can certainly interrupt a person’s life. This can also create an intense and stressful environment around their personal and professional lives. This is why it’s very important for them to get professional help. For family members, it’s also good to join support groups so that they can learn strategies on how to deal with their relatives who have this condition. It’s also a good thing for families to be an active part of treatment while gaining support for themselves.

What is bipolar II disorder: What You Need to Know

Now that you have a general idea of bipolar disorder, let’s go ahead and discuss what is bipolar II disorder? Bipolar II disorder happens when a patient experiences at least one major depressive episode and at least one hypomanic episode. They typically return to their normal function between these episodes.

What is bipolar II disorder? Patients who are experiencing bipolar II disorders often needs recommendation and therapy. This is due to depressive symptoms because it can become severe and could end up harming themselves if not properly managed. Patients can also have other mental disorder that’s occurring along with their depressive episode such as substance use disorder or anxiety disorder.

Treatment

What is bipolar II disorder? Treatments for those with Bipolar II disorder are similar to those with bipolar I disorder. It involves medication and psychotherapy. Medications are the most commonly used because it can stabilize the moods of the patient. Anti – depressants are also prescribed depending on the symptoms the person is typically experiencing. As mentioned earlier, if talk therapy and medication doesn’t help control the symptoms of depression, or the patient’s condition is just too severe, ECT is used.

Cyclothymic Disorder

Cyclothymic disorder can be described as a milder version of bipolar disorder. This can involve consistent mood swings and the person may exhibit hypomania and depressive symptoms. Hypomania and depressive symptoms often happen for people diagnosed with cyclothymic disorder. The person typically experience emotional ups and downs though the symptoms are less severe compared to bipolar I and what is bipolar II disorder.

Cyclothymic disorder symptoms usually include the following:

  • For at least 2 years, the patient may experience many periods of hypomanic and depressive symptoms. However, the symptoms don’t need the criteria for a hypomanic or depressive episode.
  • During the two-year period, the mood swings symptoms have lasted for at least half the time and have never stopped for more than 2 months.

Treatment

Just like the treatment of what is bipolar II disorder, it also involves talk therapy and medication. For many people, talk therapy can definitely help with managing the stress of the ongoing high and low moods of the patient. People diagnosed with cyclothymia may start and end their treatment over time.   

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